Custom Angular Modules :: A Guide on Creating, Publishing, and Using Angular Modules

Do you want to create a custom module that you can reuse on different Angular projects? I also have a podcast with some episodes regarding modules…and a free guide download at angularlicio.us.

free guide download at angularlicio.us

Setup

The following section outlines the tools that will be used to develop our custom angular modules. It has been awhile since I’ve updated to newer version of Angular and Typescript — so I wanted to upgrade my personal development environment for this little project. This guide is using version 5 of Angular modules and version 2.4 of Typescript. It is not a requirement to use these versions for developing custom Angular modules. Your considerations are that the versions are compatible with each other and what versions you want to target for consumers of your module.

Not everyone is going to be using the latest versions of Angular and Typescript. If you are developing custom modules to share within your private development environment (work, school), you may not want to make your modules public and availabe on repositories like npm. Therefore, the versions that you are using is not a major concern. However, if you are developing modules that you want to share with the world, because you are awesome, you will have to have at least some consideration for users of your custom module libraries.

Visual Studio Code

Visual Studio Code is a lightweight but powerful source code editor which runs on your desktop and is available for Windows, macOS and Linux. It comes with built-in support for JavaScript, TypeScript and Node.js and has a rich ecosystem of extensions for other languages (such as C++, C#, Java, Python, PHP, Go) and runtimes (such as .NET and Unity). Begin your journey with VS Code with these introductory videos.

Visual Studio Code also has many extensions that can be downloaded to customize your development environment and experience.

Node.js and NPM

Download and install node.js. We will use npm to install packages/libraries from the npm public repository.

Angular-CLI install

We will use the Angular CLI tool to generate module items. The CLI tool will create/scaffold modules, services, classes, components and more. It also can be used to compile our application. It can be used to setup new web projects (full and lightweight).

npm install -g @angular/cli@latest

Typescript Install

We will use the latest compatible version of Typescript.

npm install -g typescript@'>=2.4.2 <2.5.0'

Setup

Now that we have the basic tools installed we are ready to create a new custom angular module. We will need a new folder to build out the new custom module.

Create a simple-logger folder on your computer.

mkdir simple-logger

Since we will take advantage of the angular-cli tool we need to add (2) folders to support the tooling and folder conventions of the CLI.

Create the following folder structure in the root of the project.

src\app

package.json

Use the the npm command to create a new package.json file for the new project. This file will be used to define our module dependencies.

npm init

Learn more at:

The default contents of the package.json file is:

{
"name": "simple-logger",
"version": "1.0.0",
"description": "A simple logger module for Angular applications.",
"main": "index.js",
"scripts": {
"test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1"
},
"keywords": [
"angular",
"custom",
"module",
"logging"
],
"author": "Matt Vaughn",
"license": "MIT"
}

Update the scripts section to include the following.

"transpile": "ngc",
"build": "npm run transpile"

The current package.json file does not have any devDependencies or Dependencies. We will need to either update the file or use the npm command to add the packages to our module project.

Run the following in the terminal to add the devDependencies to the project. Note: you might have to be running Visual Studio Code in Administrator.

npm install --save-dev @angular/cli@latest
npm install --save-dev @angular/common@latest
npm install --save-dev @angular/compiler@latest
npm install --save-dev @angular/core@latest
npm install --save-dev @angular/compiler-cli@latest
npm install --save-dev typescript@'>=2.4.2 <2.5.0'

The npm install ‘ — save-dev will update the devDependencies section in the package.json ` file.

"devDependencies": {
"@angular/cli": "^1.5.0",
"@angular/common": "^5.0.1",
"@angular/compiler": "^5.0.1",
"@angular/compiler-cli": "^5.0.1",
"@angular/core": "^5.0.1",
"typescript": "^2.4.2"
}

tsconfig.json

Use the Typescript command to create a tsconfig.json file for the application. The configuration information in this file will be used to compile the Typescript.

tsc --init

The default output of the tsc --init is below. WE can customize the configuration. I like that there are comments that describe the usage of the different options.

{
"compilerOptions": {
/* Basic Options */
"target": "es5", /* Specify ECMAScript target version: 'ES3' (default), 'ES5', 'ES2015', 'ES2016', 'ES2017', or 'ESNEXT'. */
"module": "commonjs", /* Specify module code generation: 'commonjs', 'amd', 'system', 'umd', 'es2015', or 'ESNext'. */
// "lib": [], /* Specify library files to be included in the compilation: */
// "allowJs": true, /* Allow javascript files to be compiled. */
// "checkJs": true, /* Report errors in .js files. */
// "jsx": "preserve", /* Specify JSX code generation: 'preserve', 'react-native', or 'react'. */
// "declaration": true, /* Generates corresponding '.d.ts' file. */
// "sourceMap": true, /* Generates corresponding '.map' file. */
// "outFile": "./", /* Concatenate and emit output to single file. */
// "outDir": "./", /* Redirect output structure to the directory. */
// "rootDir": "./", /* Specify the root directory of input files. Use to control the output directory structure with --outDir. */
// "removeComments": true, /* Do not emit comments to output. */
// "noEmit": true, /* Do not emit outputs. */
// "importHelpers": true, /* Import emit helpers from 'tslib'. */
// "downlevelIteration": true, /* Provide full support for iterables in 'for-of', spread, and destructuring when targeting 'ES5' or 'ES3'. */
// "isolatedModules": true, /* Transpile each file as a separate module (similar to 'ts.transpileModule'). */
/* Strict Type-Checking Options */
"strict": true /* Enable all strict type-checking options. */
// "noImplicitAny": true, /* Raise error on expressions and declarations with an implied 'any' type. */
// "strictNullChecks": true, /* Enable strict null checks. */
// "noImplicitThis": true, /* Raise error on 'this' expressions with an implied 'any' type. */
// "alwaysStrict": true, /* Parse in strict mode and emit "use strict" for each source file. */
/* Additional Checks */
// "noUnusedLocals": true, /* Report errors on unused locals. */
// "noUnusedParameters": true, /* Report errors on unused parameters. */
// "noImplicitReturns": true, /* Report error when not all code paths in function return a value. */
// "noFallthroughCasesInSwitch": true, /* Report errors for fallthrough cases in switch statement. */
/* Module Resolution Options */
// "moduleResolution": "node", /* Specify module resolution strategy: 'node' (Node.js) or 'classic' (TypeScript pre-1.6). */
// "baseUrl": "./", /* Base directory to resolve non-absolute module names. */
// "paths": {}, /* A series of entries which re-map imports to lookup locations relative to the 'baseUrl'. */
// "rootDirs": [], /* List of root folders whose combined content represents the structure of the project at runtime. */
// "typeRoots": [], /* List of folders to include type definitions from. */
// "types": [], /* Type declaration files to be included in compilation. */
// "allowSyntheticDefaultImports": true, /* Allow default imports from modules with no default export. This does not affect code emit, just typechecking. */
/* Source Map Options */
// "sourceRoot": "./", /* Specify the location where debugger should locate TypeScript files instead of source locations. */
// "mapRoot": "./", /* Specify the location where debugger should locate map files instead of generated locations. */
// "inlineSourceMap": true, /* Emit a single file with source maps instead of having a separate file. */
// "inlineSources": true, /* Emit the source alongside the sourcemaps within a single file; requires '--inlineSourceMap' or '--sourceMap' to be set. */
/* Experimental Options */
// "experimentalDecorators": true, /* Enables experimental support for ES7 decorators. */
// "emitDecoratorMetadata": true, /* Enables experimental support for emitting type metadata for decorators. */
}
}

We will now modify the tsconfig.json file. Note that the rootDir item is set to src/app - this is to support using the angular-cli tool. The paths option is to allow the compiler to access the dependencies of the module.

More information about compiler options: https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/compiler-options.html

"baseUrl": "./"
"declaration": true
"experimentalDecorators": true
"inlineSourceMap": true
"inlineSources": true
"lib": ["es2015","dom"]
"module": "es2015"
"moduleResolution": "node"
"noImplicitAny": true
"outDir": "dist"
"paths": {"@angular/core": ["node_modules/@angular/core/*"]}
"rootDir": "src/app"
"sourceMap": true
"strictNullChecks": true

The following items were added to the the compilerOptions section.

  • “stripInternal”: true
  • “skipLibCheck”: true

Add the following new sections to the the tsconfig.json file. These items are not part of the compilerOptions section.

"files": [
"./src/app/index.ts"
],
"angularCompilerOptions": {
"strictMetadataEmit": true,
"genDir": "aot-dist"
}

The final configuration for tsconfig.json

{
"compilerOptions": {
"target": "es5",
"module": "es2015",
"lib": [
"es2015",
"dom"
],
/* Specify library files to be included in the compilation: */
"declaration": true,
"sourceMap": true,
"outDir": "dist",
"rootDir": "src/app",
"skipLibCheck": true,
/* Strict Type-Checking Options */
"strict": true,
"noImplicitAny": true,
"strictNullChecks": true,
"stripInternal": true,
/* Module Resolution Options */
"moduleResolution": "node",
"baseUrl": "./",
"paths": {
"@angular/core": [
"node_modules/@angular/core/*"
]
},
/* Source Map Options */
"inlineSources": true,
/* Experimental Options */
"experimentalDecorators": true
},
"files": [
"./src/app/index.ts"
],
"angularCompilerOptions": {
"strictMetadataEmit": true,
"genDir": "aot-dist"
}
}

angular-cli.json

Since we want to take advantage of the Angular CLI tool, we’ll need to add a angular-cli.json configuration file to the root of the project. Use the following content as a template for the configuration.

{
"project": {
"version": "1.0.0",
"name": "simple-logger"
},
"apps": [
{
"tsconfig": "tsconfig.json",
"mobile": false,
"root": "src",
"prefix": "app"
}
],
"defaults": {
"styleExt": "css",
"prefixInterfaces": false,
"lazyRoutePrefix": "+"
}
}

index.ts

This file is really the most important element of the solution. It will allow you to publicly expose (can I say that in technical documentation?) or allow clients to find the specified module of the package — which is very important to Angular applications.

The only project member we need to expose is the module itself. The module will actually define what elements of the module are publicly visible — more on that later.

Add a new file index.ts in the app folder. This file will be used to reference the items in the module.

ng generate module simpleLogger

SimpleLoggerModule

We are now ready to add the @NgModule to the project. We can use the CLI to do this. Use the following command to add an Angular module to the project.

ng generate module simpleLogger

Add an export statement to the index.ts file to reference the new module.

export * from './simple-logger/simple-logger.module';

We are now ready to build the module project.

.\node_modules\.bin\ngc .\tsconfig.json

The dist folder will be created (as indicated in our outDir setting in the tsconfig.json) - with the output of the ngccompile operation.

SimpleLoggerService

Use the Angular CLI to create a service for the module.

ng generate service simple-logger\simpleLogger

The CLI creates a service class with the @Injectable decorator.

simple-logger.service.ts

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';@Injectable()
export class SimpleLoggerService {
constructor() { }
}

Since we have a new member of the module, we can add it to the index.ts file.

export * from './simple-logger/simple-logger.service';

Run the build command to create the index.js file in the dist folder.

.\node_modules\.bin\ngc .\tsconfig.jsonexport * from './simple-logger/simple-logger.module';
export * from './simple-logger/simple-logger.service';
//# sourceMappingURL=index.js.map

Severity Enum,

We will now create a new member of the module. Remember to add the item to the index.ts file.

ng generate enum simple-logger\severity

The output of the CLI operation is:

export enum Severity {
}

Add some enum options.

export enum Severity {
Information = 1,
Warning = 2,
Error = 3,
Critical = 4,
Debug = 5
}

Add A Module Feature

Now that we have a service, we can add some functionality to make it more useful.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { Severity } from './severity.enum';
@Injectable()
export class SimpleLoggerService {
private source: string;
private severity: Severity;
private message: string;
private timestamp: Date;
constructor() { } /**
* Use to create a log item in the application console.
* @param source
* @param severity
* @param message
*/
log(source: string, severity: Severity, message: string) {
this.source = source;
this.severity = severity;
this.message = message;
this.timestamp = new Date();
const msg = `${this.message}`;
console.log(`${this.severity} from ${this.source}: ${msg} (${this.timestamp})`);
}
}

Dist Package.json Configuration

In order to publish the module, we will need to provide some information to the output of the build process. The distfolder needs a package.json file with some similar configuration - but with a slight change to the dependency section.

Notice, this package.json does NOT have a devDependencies or dependencies section. Normally, you wouldn't save the contents of your dist to your code repository. However, if you are publishing your module to an NPM repository, you will publish the contents of the dist folder. Therefore, I think it is reasonable to save the contents to your code repository.

{
"name": "custom-angular-modules",
"version": "1.0.0",
"description": "An Angular custom module that contains foundation elements for buildmotion Angular applications. Basically, the framework for buildmotion NG.",
"main": "index.js",
"typings": "index.d.ts",
"repository": {
"type": "git",
"url": "https://github.com/buildmotion/custom-angular-modules"
},
"keywords": [
"angular",
"custom",
"module",
"logging"
],
"author": {
"name": "Matt Vaughn",
"email": "matt.vaughn@buildmotion.com",
"url": "http://www.buildmotion.com"
},
"license": "MIT",
"bugs": {
"url": "https://github.com/buildmotion/custom-angular-modules/issues"
},
"homepage": "https://github.com/buildmotion/custom-angular-modules#readme",
"peerDependencies": {
"@angular/common": "^5.0.1",
"@angular/core": "^5.0.1"
}
}

Publishing Your Module to NPM

Use your NPM account credentials and publish the module to NPM.

npm login

Make sure you change your directory to the dist folder before you publish to NPM.

cd .\dist\
npm version patch
npm publish

Default Build Task Configuration

So far, we have been using the command below to build the project.

.\node_modules\.bin\ngc .\tsconfig.json

Use the command below to select the Tasks: Configure Default Build Task item from the list. Select the npm: Buildoption.

Ctrl + p
>task

A new task.json configuration file is created in the .vscode folder in your project. Now that you have configured the default build task, you can use the run the menu Tasks | Run Build Task ... to build the project. Or, you can use the keyboard short cut: Ctrl+Shift+B to do the same thing.

{
"tasks": [
{
"type": "npm",
"script": "build",
"group": {
"kind": "build",
"isDefault": true
}
}
]
}

Using a Custom Module…Business as Usual, Right?

Now that we have a custom angular module, we are ready to use it in one of Angular applications. We created a new web application in a local development folder. Once again, use the Angular CLI to create a new application.

ng new ngAppOne

Using the Module

Since we published the SimpleLoggingModule to NPM, we can use npm to retrieve the package and add the reference in our package.json file. We use the latest version of the package - in this case it is a 1.0.x version. Later, we'll update the module to include some enhanced features (version 2.0.x) and use the new version in a different web application. This will demonstrate the process of versioning the module and its usage by different applications.

The 1.0.3 version contains the basic feature of just logging to the application's console. This is fine for now, we are demonstrating the end-to-end path of creating a module, publishing the module, and consuming the module in an application.

npm i --save custom-angular-modules@1.0.3

When we use the --save switch, npm will update our dependencies section of the package.json file to include our requested package. Notice that the version requested was 1.0.3, however, npm updated the reference to ^1.0.3. This

  • More information about https://docs.npmjs.com/getting-started/semantic-versioning
  • Caret ranges are ideal when an author may make breaking changes between 0.2.4 and 0.3.0 releases, which is a common practice. However, it presumes that there will not be breaking changes between 0.2.4 and 0.2.5. It allows for changes that are presumed to be additive (but non-breaking), according to commonly observed practices
"dependencies": {
"@angular/common": "^2.4.0",
"@angular/compiler": "^2.4.0",
"@angular/core": "^2.4.0",
"@angular/forms": "^2.4.0",
"@angular/http": "^2.4.0",
"@angular/platform-browser": "^2.4.0",
"@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "^2.4.0",
"@angular/router": "^3.4.0",
"core-js": "^2.4.1",
"custom-angular-modules": "^1.0.3",
"rxjs": "^5.1.0",
"zone.js": "^0.7.6"
}

Let’s Attempt to Compile

Compile the application. We will now get the following ERROR. Oh no. There is a version mismatch — this is a typical dependency issue that all custom module developers need to be aware of.

ERROR in Metadata version mismatch for module ./source/apps/ngAppOne/node_modules/custom-angular-modules/index.d.ts, 
found version 4, expected 3, resolving symbol AppModule in ./source/apps/ngAppOne/src/app/app.module.ts,
resolving symbol AppModule in ./source/apps/ngAppOne/src/app/app.module.ts

We will need to fix this problem by going back to the code of the custom module. We will need to make sure that we are referencing the correct module dependencies and versions to make sure they are compatible with the consumer of this custom module. Making any changes to the custom module will require us to publish a new version to NPM so that consumers of the module will no longer have the version error as shown above.

After examining the versions in the custom module we see that this module is using version 5 for core common. However, the web application is referencing version 2 of the same modules. Therefore, if we upgrade the web application to use the latest versions of angular we will be in sync with the custom module that we developed.

We can upgrade the versions of the angular and CLI modules by running the followign NPM commands. This issue demonstrates the the requirement of managing dependencies and versions for the application and also the custom module under consideration.

npm install --save @angular/common@latest
npm install --save @angular/compiler@latest
npm install --save @angular/core@latest
npm install --save @angular/forms@latest
npm install --save @angular/http@latest
npm install --save @angular/platform-browser@latest
npm install --save @angular/platform-browser-dynamic@latest
npm install --save @angular/router@latest
npm install --save-dev typescript@2.4.2
npm install --save-dev @angular/cli@latest
npm install --save-dev @angular/compiler-cli@latest

Let’s attempt another compile. A general rule for Angular applications is to use the same version for all @angular modules.

> Executing task: npm run build <> ng-app-one@0.0.0 build B:\development\custom-angular-modules\source\apps\ngAppOne
> ng build
Date: 2017-11-15T21:10:56.800Z
Hash: 813e0fe8dcae8310e61b
Time: 8089ms
chunk {inline} inline.bundle.js, inline.bundle.js.map (inline) 5.83 kB [entry] [rendered]
chunk {main} main.bundle.js, main.bundle.js.map (main) 7.09 kB [initial] [rendered]
chunk {polyfills} polyfills.bundle.js, polyfills.bundle.js.map (polyfills) 185 kB [initial] [rendered]
chunk {styles} styles.bundle.js, styles.bundle.js.map (styles) 11.3 kB [initial] [rendered]
chunk {vendor} vendor.bundle.js, vendor.bundle.js.map (vendor) 2.68 MB [initial] [rendered]

Terminal will be reused by tasks, press any key to close it.

Dependencies

There are always dependencies in software applications. Applications will rely on underlying frameworks like .NET, ASP.NET, Angular, jQuery, or others. Your software is in different states over time and so are the custom angular modules that you develop. Therefore in the stream of time your application will always be evolving and it will have different versions. Also, the modules and packages that you depend on will also evolve over time and will have different versions as well.

So as a custom module developer, you may need to target specific versions of dependencies so that consumers of your custom module will be able to use it. For example, if I am using the latest version of Angular, which by the way is version 5, and consumers of your module are using an earlier version, you will have an incompatibility problems — as seen in the error above.

One way around this is to use a lowest common denominator approach when developing a custom module. This will allow users of your custom module to have access to all the features of the module and still have the benefit of using a lower version of Typescript or Angular or other dependencies that that they may have. You then have an opportunity to create newer versions of your module with different dependencies. By doing this, you allow users of your module to target a specific version that is compatible with their application.

If you are a custom module developer and you are consuming your own modules (i.e., private development environment) then your concern will only be making sure that the dependency versions are aligned and in sync with the application that you develop in. This is much easier. If this is your scenario, you might want to consider purchasing an NPM private repository so that your modules are only available to your development team.

Updating the Application Module to use the LoggingModule

Basically, we need to provide the SimpleLoggerService to the application. In our example, we will do this in the AppModule. As your application grows, or if you are building an application of a known size/structure/importance etc., you might consider adding these modules in either CoreModule or SharedModule items as determined by their usage and scope. A CoreModuleshould only be initialized once in the application - The core module has a special purpose and only a single instance is required. See the slide deck presentation or the video presentations when they're available on https://angularlicious.teachable.com for a more detailed explanations of when/how you would use Core and Shared modules.

Import the module and service. The custom-angular-modules package/module should be installed in the node_modulesdirectory of the application. If you do not have this folder, you will need to run the npm install command to create it.

import { SimpleLoggerModule, SimpleLoggerService } from 'custom-angular-modules';

Now that we have a reference to the service, we can add it to the providers list in the @NgModule declaration section. When we provide the service in the AppModule it means the scope of the service is global to the entire application. For this type of service, this is exactly what we want. Therefore as a module developer you wouldn't want to provide the service in the custom module that you are developing. You would want the consumer of your module to be able to have control over when and where the service is provided. So if your custom module is a service module you would never want to provide that service in the @NgModule providers declaration.

After the changes to the app.module.ts code, the new SimpleLoggerService will now be available to other members of the application.

import { BrowserModule } from '@angular/platform-browser';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { FormsModule } from '@angular/forms';
import { HttpModule } from '@angular/http';
import { SimpleLoggerModule, SimpleLoggerService } from 'custom-angular-modules';
import { AppComponent } from './app.component';
@NgModule({
declarations: [
AppComponent
],
imports: [
BrowserModule,
FormsModule,
HttpModule
],
providers: [
SimpleLoggerService
],
bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})
export class AppModule { }

Updating Components

Remember that the definition of an angular module is that it is a container of closely related things that work together to provide some feature, service, or functionality. Your angular web applicaton has a root module AppModule - this module can also own components and use them to basically compose the features of the application. Angular application require at least one component. By default, the Angular CLI creates an AppComponent.

When we use the Angular CLI tool, it not only creates the components but it also adds them to a module. This is really cool. Components are always owned by an @NgModule - they cannot exist by themselves.

I think taking advantage of tools like the angular CLI allows developers to be more efficient; and to focus on building amazing applications rather than spending time writing code that can be generated. When we use scaffolding tools like the CLI it also allows us to be more consistent in our implementation of our services, components, and modules. This is a good thing.

Therefore, I think it is a great idea to become familiar with all of the abilities of the Angular CLI so that you can improve your practice and delivery of applications, and becoming more efficient. Maybe your friends and coworkers will be amazed at the quality of your code and how fast you deliver your applications. And you might even get a raise, right?

app.module.ts

import { BrowserModule } from '@angular/platform-browser';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { FormsModule } from '@angular/forms';
import { HttpModule } from '@angular/http';
import { SimpleLoggerModule, SimpleLoggerService } from 'custom-angular-modules';import { AppComponent } from './app.component';@NgModule({
declarations: [
AppComponent,
],
imports: [
BrowserModule,
FormsModule,
HttpModule
],
providers: [
SimpleLoggerService
],
bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})
export class AppModule { }

Now that we at least one component to view, we will need to provide routes to the application. We can implement a new module for routing. Once again let’s use the Angular CLI to create a module for providing routes to the application.

ng g module appRouting

app-routing.module.ts

import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { CommonModule, } from '@angular/common';
import { BrowserModule } from '@angular/platform-browser';
import { Routes, RouterModule } from '@angular/router';
import { AppComponent } from './../app.component';const routes: Routes = [
{ path: 'home', component: AppComponent },
{ path: '', redirectTo: 'home', pathMatch: 'full' },
];
@NgModule({
imports: [
CommonModule,
BrowserModule,
RouterModule.forRoot(routes)
],
exports: [
],
})
export class AppRoutingModule { }

Take Your Module to the Next Level

Many times, a custom module will require some application-specific information. So, how does Angular provide information to a module? We certainly do not want the module to be responsible for retrieving information that it requires. Angular is consistent in how it provides things. It uses dependency injection. This is how it works.

  1. The custom module provides a structure (i.e., a class) as a container for required configuration.
  2. When the module is referenced and provided by the container module, it will call a static forRoot() method on the target custom module and pass in the container of information. The container being in the same shape as defined by the module

What we will do next is to perform the steps outlined above to create a configuration for the custom module. We will inject or rather allow Angular to provide the configuration data to the module.

How do we provide confgiuration information to a Module/Service?

To enable configuration for a specified module and allow it to be used in the module’s services and components, we need to create a new class that defines [what] is configured. In our example, we will create a [loggingServiceConfig] class with a public [applicationName] property.

export class loggingServiceConfig {    constructor(public applicationName: string) {
}
}

Now we need to allow the configuration to be sent in from an application that will be using the [SimpleLoggingService]. By convention, Angular developers will create a static method on the custom module called forRoot(..). This static method will create the mechanism for the application to provide configuration to the module.

  1. Import the ModuleWithProviders from angular\core. This is the return object of the static method forRoot(..).
  2. Import the configuration class.
  3. Create a static method called forRoot that takes a config parameter of type SimpleLoggerConfig. The static method will need to return an object that with the same data shape as the ModuleWithProviders interface (e.g., module type and list of providers).
  4. Set the value for the ngModule property to the type of the specified module.
  5. Create a ValueProvider item for the providers array. Set the value of the provide property to the type SimpleLoggerConfig.
  6. Set the value of the useValue property of the ValueProvider item using the parameter passed into the static method.

Here is the updated module with the static forRoot() method implementation.

simple-logger.module.ts

import { ModuleWithProviders, NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { CommonModule } from '@angular/common';
import { SimpleLoggerConfig } from './simple-logger.config';
@NgModule({
exports: [
],
imports: [
CommonModule
],
declarations: []
})
export class SimpleLoggerModule {
/**
* A static method to provide configuration to the [SimpleLoggerModule].
* @param config Use the [SimpleLoggerConfig] to provide configuration
* information to the module.
*/
static forRoot(config: SimpleLoggerConfig) {
return {
ngModule: SimpleLoggerModule,
providers: [{provide: SimpleLoggerConfig, useValue: config}]
};
}
}

Below, we have the interfaces from Angular that provide the mechanism to inject configuration into a module.

export interface ModuleWithProviders {
ngModule: Type<any>;
providers?: Provider[];
}

The ValueProvider allows you to specify the object that will be provided and its value. In our example, the applciation will provide a SimpleLoggerConfig type that contains the value applicationName.

export interface ValueProvider {
/**
* An injection token. (Typically an instance of `Type` or `InjectionToken`, but can be `any`).
*/
provide: any;
/**
* The value to inject.
*/
useValue: any;
/**
* If true, then injector returns an array of instances. This is useful to allow multiple
* providers spread across many files to provide configuration information to a common token.
*
* ### Example
*
* {example core/di/ts/provider_spec.ts region='MultiProviderAspect'}
*/
multi?: boolean;
}

Now, when an Angular application calls the forRoot() static method and sends in an instance of the SimpleLoggerConfigclass, the logging module and any other elements in the module will have access to the confgiuration information. I would recommend that the module do some validation on the configuration parameter sent in. You might want to provide some default values and/or implement some exception management depending on the needs of the application.

The example presented is very simple — but it demonstrates the mechanism of providing configuration to a module. The shape of the configuration data depends on the requirements and needs of the module. Also, it is important to note that the configuration data is now available to members of the module — globally scoped to the specified module.

Use the Configuration Within the Module

The SimpleLoggerConfig is now available for the service to use. The code below shows the updated service using the configuration data injected into the constructor. If you install the Chrome plugin Augury, it should show you the structure of the module and where the configuration is provided and available.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { Severity } from './severity.enum';
import { SimpleLoggerConfig } from './simple-logger.config';@Injectable()
export class SimpleLoggerService {
private source: string;
private severity: Severity;
private message: string;
private timestamp: Date;
private applicationName: string;
/**
* The constructor for the [SimpleLoggerService].
* @param config Configuration information injected into the constructor.
*/
constructor(
private config: SimpleLoggerConfig // injected by ng; constructor injection
) {
if (config) {
this.applicationName = config.applicationName;
}
}
/**
* Use to create a log item in the application console.
* @param source
* @param severity
* @param message
*/
log(source: string, severity: Severity, message: string) {
this.source = source;
this.severity = severity;
this.message = message;
this.timestamp = new Date();
const msg = `${this.message}`;
console.log(`${this.severity} from ${this.applicationName}.${this.source}: ${msg} (${this.timestamp})`);
}
}

This is a significant change to the logging module. Therefore, we will up the version of the module. We have a breaking change by modifiying the constructor of the logging service.

Modify the version of the ./dist/package.json file using the npm command below.

npm version major
npm publish

Version 2.0.0 :: Custom Module with Configuration

Now that we have a 2.0 version of the module, we will create a new web application ngAppDos that will use the new version of the custom module. So we will update the application's package.json to use the new version.

npm uninstall custom-angular-modules
npm install --save custom-angular-modules@latest

Now…let’s see if it works, Use npm start and launch the Chrome debugger. Now the application will fail like a cow - utter failure. See the error below.

No provider for SimpleLoggerConfig!

This means that we haven’t provided the SimpleLoggerConfig for the SimpleLoggerModule. If you recall, the module contains a static method that we can use to provide the configuration data. We need to update the `

SimpleLoggerModule.forRoot({applicationName: `ngAppDos`}),

Notice that we only pass in the shape of the data as a parameter of the forRoot() method of the SimpleLoggerModule. This is all that is required.

import { BrowserModule } from '@angular/platform-browser';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { FormsModule } from '@angular/forms';
import { HttpModule } from '@angular/http';
import { RouterModule } from '@angular/router';
import { SimpleLoggerModule, SimpleLoggerService } from 'custom-angular-modules';
import { AppRoutingModule } from './app-routing/app-routing.module';
import { AppComponent } from './app.component';
@NgModule({
declarations: [
AppComponent,
],
imports: [
BrowserModule,
FormsModule,
HttpModule,
SimpleLoggerModule.forRoot({applicationName: `ngAppDos`}),
AppRoutingModule, // defines available app routes;
RouterModule, // required to engage <router-outlet>
],
providers: [
SimpleLoggerService
],
bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})
export class AppModule { }

Now when we run the application. The [applicationName] passed in as configuration to the module is used by the logging service in the module. We now have the name of the application in the log item: ngAppDos.AppComponent.

from ngAppDos.AppComponent: Running constructor for the AppComponent. (Thu Nov 16 2017 01:18:06 GMT-0700 (Mountain Standard Time))
simple-logger.service.js:39

I love tacos, code, jazz, my husky and maybe 3 people in this world...and of course: Angular. Angularlicious podcast — more info at www.AngularArchitecture.com

I love tacos, code, jazz, my husky and maybe 3 people in this world...and of course: Angular. Angularlicious podcast — more info at www.AngularArchitecture.com